Science Policy

SfN Triangle Chapter member and 2014 SfN Early Career Policy Fellow, Shannon Farris, Ph.D., poses for a picture with Congressman David Price (NC-04) before the March for Science in downtown Raleigh, NC.
SfN Triangle Chapter member and 2014 SfN Early Career Policy Fellow, Shannon Farris, Ph.D., poses for a picture with Congressman David Price (NC-04) before the March for Science in downtown Raleigh, NC.

For all of the promise and scientific breakthroughs made possible by the field of neuroscience, funding for our research is overwhelmingly provided through state and federal government grants. With research on human neurological disease so dependent on state and federal funding, it becomes important for all neuroscientists to be informed on specific legislative funding decisions that may impact the ability to carry out publicly beneficial research. With this in mind, the Triangle Society for Neuroscience (SfN) Science Policy Committee exists to make information on local, state, and US government policy affecting neuroscience research readily accessible to all of our chapter members. In addition, we also meet and regularly contact North Carolina state and federal legislators to discuss how neuroscience research is beneficial to the health and economy of the Triangle region, North Carolina, and the United States.

The goal of the Triangle SfN Science Policy Committee is to provide critical information on relevant policy and legislation for busy neuroscientists so that they may stay better informed on decisions that impact their work. If you would like more information or to become involved in the committee please contact Committee Chair Dr. Ryan Bell at: trianglesfnscipol@gmail.com

Committee Chair: Dr. Ryan Bell (UNC-Chapel Hill)

Committee Members: Dr. Shannon Farris (NIEHS), Dr. Amir Rezvani (Duke), Dr. Sarah Banducci (Banducci Science Consulting, LLC)


Policy Committee Updates:

The Triangle Chapter seeks to continue connecting neuroscientists across North Carolina by hosting events for scientific exchange and networking, while also keeping the NC community and legislators informed of the importance of neuroscience research to our state. We recently invited our NC senators to join the poster session of our annual Spring Neuroscience Conference to showcase the science of NC trainees, however, their offices were unable to attend. Instead, we were able to set up meeting with the Executive Director of the North Carolina Board of Science, Technology & Innovation of the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce to discuss the role of the Triangle Chapter in organizing local neuroscientists and learn best practices for engaging local and state government officials.